7 podcasts to learn more about climate change and how to fight it

Your moment
Every person I know, including myself, is constantly looking for new podcasts to listen to. If true crime isn't your thing, here are seven great podcasts about climate change that are entertaining and informative at the same time.

1. America Adapts

America Adapts is produced and hosted by climate change adaptation expert Doug Parsons. In each episode, Parson’s talks to scientists, journalists, activist, policymakers and climate heroes about the challenges of adapting to climate change and they discuss approaches that they believe are already working.

The podcast is, as its name suggests, focused on the US and the nation's journey in dealing with climate change, but it's very informative and inspiring for everyone around the world.

Episode tip: #75 in which Doug Parsons attends a town hall meeting with women, LGBTQ+ people, and people of colour about fighting climate change. He goes to Africatown to learn about the relationship between racism and environmental collapse and talks to a protest community that also serves refugees fleeing from climate change-related disasters.

Great episode to hear from people who aren’t visible in mainstream media despite being on the frontlines of the battle against climate change.

2. Climate Cash

Climate Cash is a three-episode long podcast series by the Australian branch of the World Wildlife Foundation. The Foundation’s Conservation Director Dr. Gilly Llewellyn talks to experts from the public and private sectors, community leaders, and government workers about the threats climate change poses to South East Asia and the Pacific region.

They also discuss what Australia can do to reverse the negative consequences of climate collapse.

3. Climate Conversations

Climate Conversations is a podcast produced by MIT Climate. MIT Climate is Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s hub for all the scientific work being done on climate change across the university. They describe it as “a place for worldwide discussion and learning”.

With MIT Climate, the institute aims to “to connect questions to answers, research to solutions, and knowledge to action.” If you’d like to know what’s happening from a scientific point of view, Climate Conversations makes climate science accessible and easy to understand even for science n00bz like me.

4. Climate Cast

For concise and informative climate change stories NPR’s Climate Cast is the podcast to listen to. Depending on the day and on the guests, episodes go from five minutes to over an hour, so you’ve always got something to listen to, no matter if you’re just brushing your teeth in the morning or you’re on your long commute to work.

5. Costing the Earth

Across the pond, Costing the Earth is a BBC podcast about climate change. In their words, the podcast looks at “man's effect on the environment and how [the environment] reacts”. They cover a diverse range of topics from building golf courses on sand dunes to climate changes' effects on human and animal fertility.

My favourite thing about Costing the Earth is that they challenge widely accepted and popular climate change ‘trends’. In the episode ‘Plasticphobia’ for example, the host Tom Heap talks to experts about whether plastic is as bad as popular discourse makes it seem to be.

6. Mothers of Invention

A personal favourite, Mothers of Invention celebrates feminists that are taking action against climate breakdown across the world.

Hosted by Ireland's first female president Mary Robinson and comic Maeve Higgins, Mothers of Invention is funny, informative and inspiring. In each episode, they talk to badass climate heroes like Kenya’s former environment minister Judy Wakhungu and the amazing eco-feminist author, activist, scientific advisor, food sovereignty advocate and seed saver Vandana Shiva.

7. No place like home

If you’re looking for something with a bit more of a personal touch, No Place Like Home is a podcast about personal choices people make in the face of future environmental catastrophe.

Host Ashley Ahearn travels across the US and interviews people about their experiences in fighting climate change. These choices cover a literal lifespan from deciding whether to have children or not to composting your body after death.

And if you don't like any of these podcasts, why not set up a podcast yourself? Find out how with our story about citizen audio journalism.

More Stories

  • Bollywood's PadMan challenges the stigma around periods in India

    Solutions
    "America has Batman, Superman, and Spiderman; but India has PadMan.”

    Arunachalam Muruganantham is an innovator from India who first became known in 2012 thanks to his machine that produces cheap and durable menstrual pads for women in India. Six years and a lot of success later, his story is now a Bollywood movie by the name of PadMan.

    Muruganantham first started to work on his innovation thanks to his wife. Upon seeing her use old rags that he “wouldn’t even clean his two-wheeler with”, he started experimenting with different materials using his wife and sisters as test subjects.

    Menstrual pads in India, at the time of Muruganantham’s first foray into the research, were too expensive for most women to use regularly and the social stigma around menstruation added to the lack of access to hygienic menstrual products.

    Still, 40 percent of women in India don’t have access to sanitary products during their period.

    Back in his homemade lab, Arunachalam Muruganantham’s first tries weren’t going so well and, eventually, his wife and sisters got sick of their roles as guinea pigs and went back to their rags.

    He tried to find volunteers to test out his inventions but as menstruation was and still is a taboo in India he had trouble finding anyone who was willing to speak to him about her experiences.

    Thus, Muruganantham decided to test his ideas on himself, devising a concoction from rubber and animal blood. However, some people from his village caught him and he was ostracised for both his “crazy” ideas and his openness about the topic of menstruation.

    Even his wife broke up with him.

    Despite all of this, Muruganantham kept on with his research, believing that he was onto something. And he was indeed. It took him years but he ended up inventing a machine that can produce low cost sanitary pads.

    In 2014 Muruganantham was on the Times list of 100 most influential people for all his contributions to women’s health in India; In 2016 he was given the Padma Shri by the Indian Government, the fourth highest civilian award.

    Muruganantham’s research and invention not only brought affordable and hygienic menstrual products to women in India but his work also has contributed greatly to the fight against the social stigma against menstruation in the country.

    PadManis another step towards defeating the stigma. Only a few years ago even talking about menstruation was frowned upon in the country but now it is the subject of a Bollywood film starring one of India’s most prominent leading men Arijit Singh.

    Talking about menstruation, along with providing women and girls hygienic, and affordable, menstrual products both saves their lives and greatly improves them.

    Read more
  • 'Hi, I'm Rosa, I'm 14, and I'm worried for my generation'

    Your moment

    "My name is Rosa Anders. I’m 14 years old and I am afraid for my generation. I am afraid of the environmental chaos climate change will bring and how it will impact me and my peers' lives. I’m just a teenager so I don’t have the solutions to these major world problems, but I believe part of it lies in individual actions.

    I am a member of the youth council of War Child. War Child is an organization that helps children who are or have been in a war. They do this by giving the children a safe place where they can play, get an education and psychological support.

    I am not a child of war. On the contrary, I had a very safe and privileged childhood, so why am I on the council? I believe if policies are made for children, they should have a say about them too.

    The youth council of War Child advises the organisation on policies. War Child is in the process of creating a youth council in each of the fifteen countries they are active in. This way, eventually there will be youth advising War Child around the world. Until then, since children at war can’t speak up directly, we — the free children  — should do our part.

    I was always interested in War Child and find what they do very important, and I always wanted to help them, but I never really knew how. I think this is a common issue that young people have.  There are so many world problems that need to be solved: Child marriage, discrimination, war, climate change, the list does not end. But I don’t think we are helpless.

    For example at War Child Netherlands, with the help of an external expert, we have been making a list of all the things we can do to save energy and make the building War Child operates in more sustainable. We put stickers on all the meat in the fridge, indicating how much water was used for its production and how much CO2 was emitted. We also added a Youth Council sticker asking to choose for alternatives to meat.

    Any young person can join youth councils, collect money, participate in fundraising events, for example, The Dam Tot Damloop or Cityswim in the Netherlands. We can contribute to spreading the word about world issues and possible solutions by giving presentations in schools. It is very important to realize not everything is just for adults.

    I think that if we all work together and everyone does something we can solve these world problems. I’m not saying that everyone has to be an activist, what I mean is that if everyone does something, and it doesn’t even have to be something big, then it helps. From making a donation to spending one day a month working at a charity, we can all contribute to make this world a better place.

    Rosa "

    This story features:
    Read more
  • Forbes introduces a philanthropy score to their 400 richest list

    Your moment

    Every year, Forbes magazine publishes a list of the 400 richest people in the US. How the list is compiled is pretty straightforward: it is a list of US citizens (and permanent residents) who have made the substantial majority of their fortunes in the US. It’s a list of billionaires.

    Forbes doesn’t explain in detail how they calculate the net worth of the people on the list but we know that they take into account both the assets these people have  (companies, cars, boats, planes, islands,...) — and their debts.

    Each year, the list is pretty much the same. Same names switching ranks, making a few more or a few less million each year; mostly men, mostly white, mostly above 40.

    However, this year brought a new addition to the list: a philanthropy score. For the first time, billionaires are ranked not just on how much money they have but also on their generosity. Each billionaire is scored on a scale of 1 to 5 with 5 being the most generous.

    The two main factors behind Forbes’ methodology in calculating philanthropy scores are an estimate of each individual’s total lifetime giving and the percentage of their fortune they have donated. In some instances, Forbes explains, billionaires have been bumped up or brought down based on other factors like personal involvement in their charitable giving.

     Here are some highlights from the newly introduced philanthropy score:

    • Out of 400 people who have a net worth of at least $2.9 billion, only 29 received the highest score of five.

    • In terms of percentage, right-wing media’s favourite boogeyman George Soros was the most generous: giving 79 percent of his wealth, $32 billion, to his own philanthropic network Open Society Foundation.

    • In not-so-surprising news, Bill Gates has donated the most with $35.8 billion, 27 percent of his fortune.

    • Jeff Bezos, who moved from the second richest in 2017 to the richest person in the US in 2018, breaking Bill Gates’ 24-year streak, only received a score of two out of five.

    • 76 of the 400 richest received the lowest possible score meaning: to date, they gave away less than one percent of their fortune or less than 30 million.

    • Amongst these 76 is US President Donald Trump, the first billionaire president in US history.

    But here’s the thing. We should approach the philanthropy scores on this list, as well as the people, with a grain, neigh a family-sized salt shaker, of salt.

    Firstly because, the system these people manage to get rich on, capitalism, is one that eats the poor and the disenfranchised. As apparent by the overload of white men with at least a middle-class background on the list, if you’re not born with these qualities and an added bonus of inexplicable and unearned entitlement, ‘making it’ is nearly impossible.

    Second, Forbes only calculates the amount and the percentage of donations. Where these donations go and their impact isn’t a part of Forbes’ methodology.

    Take, for example, The Koch Brothers who share the number seven spot on the list with $53.5 billion net worth each. Both Kochs have a philanthropy score of 4 and Forbes estimates that each has donated two percent of his fortune. However, The Kochs are infamous for their right-wing politics and disregard for the environment. The brothers are founders of so-called non-profit organisations like The Cato Institute and Americans for Prosperity, a think thank and a citizen activist group, which essentially are tools for policy change that serve the Koch’s financial and political interest. Nevertheless, they are non-profit foundations on paper so donating to them still adds to the philanthropy score.

    Read more